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Spring on the Rudy Farm

May 21, 2011

I am beginning to understand why farmers (or “country folk” in general…to perpetuate lame and inadequate stereotypes) don’t like leaving the land for any amount of time, especially in the spring. Although I don’t believe anything should inhibit us from living our lives and understanding ourselves better through travel and experience out of the realm of the familiar, I feel a twang of pain returning back to VA after almost a week in NYC, where I have missed so much of the happenings of spring that are long lost until next year. For one, everything is in bloom. Irises, peonies, roses, little flowers that I don’t know what they’re called. The asparagus has shot up and fallen over heavy with seed for next year’s crop. Barn swallows swoop dangerously near to the house, betraying the proximity of their nests. And of course, the chickens continue to grow! Below are some of my discoveries as we return to the Rudy farm, beginning with the progress of the amazing little birds Wile discovered over a week ago in an old, empty coal stove, followed by some of the bloom at our house.

After only 9 days, these birds went from featherless to full feathers and full of flight! One bird took her first flight when I opened the hatch! Falling to the ground at first, she shortly after took off into the air! It was exhilarating to witness. The others laid calmly on each other.

Their feathers are in!

Young ready for flight

I was surprised to come home last night and find the peonies not only had bloomed, but were hanging heavy on the bushes!

Although short-lived, they are fragrant and consuming. There is something so precious about only having access to these flowers for a short time each spring, yet in such abundance.

Some of the rose bushes have also begun to bloom.

The flowers that are planted hear were planted many years ago and nurtured each season.

The name of these climbing flowers eludes me as I type, but they are heavy in the front and back of the house. No wonder so many houses around this area are white--the perfect canvas for the spring growth!

Unbelievably beautiful yet so briefly in bloom. Such a paradox of nature that imbues most areas of our lives.

Greenery has popped up everywhere. As much as I love the colors of the flowers in bloom, the textures and shapes of the greenery is subtle but alluring. I came home to find these plants surrounding my front door! Although the amount of rain that we are receiving across the country is harming many, including not allowing farmers (like the Bowmans) to bale hay and even flooding people's homes, it is also giving so much life to some of the plants and flowers around the house. Now the garden...that's another story. Boy am I glad we waited to put things in the ground this year! The garden is tilled at Mill Creek, waiting to be planted, and currently, would make a better rice patty than anything else. And the raised beds we built at the Rudy farm are filled with worms, compost, manure, and pond dirt, but no plants yet... Rain, rain, go away!

Some more beautiful, velvety greenery behind the house...and a bold little chicken that followed me over to investigate!

You ask, what kind of blogger introduces the major characters of the story of the Bowman Family, the little chicks, and doesn’t post an update? A bad blogger…that would be me. Although I can’t catch you up completely on the last three months and 20 days of the lives of these chicks, I can bring you up to speed on their chween (chick-tween) phase. As you remember, these little peeps arrived via USPS on January 31st. Out of all of the chicks, 25 survived with a recent addition named Lucille (more to come on Lucille).

I will continue this post, with a full update on the chickens, tomorrow. Until then, goodnight. And welcome back to the Bowman Farm (located, confusingly, on the Rudy Farm) in springtime. We’ve missed you.

Wile and Beacon watching the chickens out the front door

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